The Spirit of the Forest - Episode 15

Produced by: 
KBOO
Air date: 
Wed, 09/02/2015 - 12:00am
A podcast featuring audio drama, dark comedy, & other unexpected vignettes from Corvallis & beyond.
This is episode 15 of The Spirit of the Forest, an audio drama / dark comedy created by Oregon resident Dan Crall.  This program reflects upon the sadness, the absurdity, and normalcy of modern life.  It finds that delicate balance of light and darkness, blending fiction and reality.
 
This edition features a solemn musical opening by Corvallis musician Dale Combes, we listen to the first known audio recording from 1860, followed by a visit with an interstellar dispatcher given the divine assignment of keeping everyone and everything on time.  We meander along to the last moments at the infamous Jonestown People's Temple in Guayana with Jim Jones and friends.  We welcome back to Corvallis one of its finest residents, Trevor Heald, with a visit to Alsea Falls where rocks and rhythm come together amidst surreal, tall old growth trees. The Spirit of the Forest reaches out with an experimental narrative called "Formations" just before Dan catches up with an old high school chum on the phone. As we conclude, Nate Harwood performs his world class, spot-on impersonation of a plastic container just before the ceremony of thanks begins.  

This episode features the musical contributions of Stone Glass Steel, Dale Combes, Brutum Fulmen, and the 19th century inventor Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville - inventor of the Phonoautograph. Some of the voices on this episode include Joe Barsic, Dan Crall, Karl (last name unknown), Trevor Heald, Katie Rose, Nate Harwood, Darby Wright, Miles Alberts, and cult leader Jim Jones and some his followers from the Peoples' Temple, recorded in Guyana in 1978.

This episode was produced in June of 2015, mostly recorded in Corvallis and Eugene, OR and at Alsea Falls in the Coast Range Mountains. The Jonestown audio comes from a cassette tape recorded in Guyana in November of 1978, and the Phonautograph audio was recorded in France in 1860.
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